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A social constructivist analysis of civil-military relations: US-Mexican bilateral military relations, 2000-2008

Campbell, Colin (2008) A social constructivist analysis of civil-military relations: US-Mexican bilateral military relations, 2000-2008. Doctoral thesis, University of Liverpool.

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Abstract

This thesis looks at the nature of civil-military relations in the post-Cold War and the post-9/11 era through the theoretical lens of social constructivism. The study looks at the inter-relationship between the respective civil-military relations and US-Mexican bilateral ties from a constructivist perspective, with the aim of deconstructing the ideational structures of civil-military relations within the state and the state based international system to promote stronger organic structures for civilian control over the state agents of violence. The aim of thesis is to provide a theoretical model to both unite the theoretical rationale for the humanisation, indeed demilitarisation, of security concerns within the Western Hemisphere and in particular the US and Mexico. Hence, creating a novel theoretical model for the understanding and explanation of civil-military and bilateral relations.

Item Type:Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects:F History United States, Canada, Latin America > F1201 Latin America (General)
J Political Science > JZ International relations
E History America > E151 United States (General)
Departments, Research Centres and Related Units:Academic Faculties, Institutes and Research Centres > Faculty of Arts > School of Cultures, Languages and Area Studies
Refereed:No
Status:Unpublished
ID Code:1189
Deposited On:07 Dec 2010 10:51
Last Modified:02 May 2012 09:41

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