Skip navigation
   
 
Scholarly Communication
Contacts

Factors associated with dog ownership and contact with dogs in a UK community

Westgarth, Carri; Pinchbeck, Gina L; Bradshaw, John W.S.; Dawson, Susan; Gaskell, Rosalind M and Christley, Robert M (2007) Factors associated with dog ownership and contact with dogs in a UK community. BMC Veterinary Research, 3 . Article Number: 5. ISSN 1746-6148

[img]
Preview
PDF
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

279Kb

Abstract

Background: Dogs are popular pets in many countries. Identifying differences between those who own dogs or have contact with dogs, and those who do not, is useful to those interested in the human-animal bond, human health and for provision of veterinary services. This census-based, epidemiological study aimed to investigate factors associated with dog ownership and contact with dogs, in a semi-rural community of 1278 households in Cheshire, UK. Results: Twenty-four percent of households were identified as dog-owning and 52% owned a pet of some type. Multivariable logistic regression suggested that households were more likely to own a dog if they had more occupants (five or more); if they had an adult female household member; or if they owned a horse. The age structure of the households was also associated with dog ownership, with households containing older children (between six and 19 years of age) and young adults (between 20 and 29 years of age), more likely to own dogs. We also found that dog owning households were more likely to be multi-dog households than single-dog if they also owned a cat or a bird, or if the household contained a person of 20–29 years old. Dog owners reported increased contact with dogs, other than their own, compared to those that did not own dogs and this contact appeared to be mainly through walking. Conclusion: Some household types are more likely to own a dog than others. This study supports the suggestion that dogs are more common in families who have older children (6–19 years), as has been generally observed in other countries. Dog owners are also more likely to have contact with dogs other than their own, compared with those not owning a dog.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:9 pages (page numbers not for citation purposes). Published: 3 April 2007.
Uncontrolled Keywords:human-animal bond; zoonotic infections
Subjects:S Agriculture > SF Animal culture
Departments, Research Centres and Related Units:Academic Faculties, Institutes and Research Centres > Faculty of Veterinary Science > Department of Veterinary Clinical Science
DOI:10.1186/1746-6148-3-5
Publisher's Statement:© 2007 Westgarth et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Related URLs:
Refereed:Yes
Status:Published
ID Code:137
Deposited On:11 Oct 2007 12:05
Last Modified:22 May 2012 10:49

Repository Staff Only: item control page

   
Search


Full text only
Peer reviewed only

Browse
Cross Archive Search
Find
Top 50 authors
Top 50 items
[more statistics]
 
   

These pages are maintained by Library Staff @ University of Liverpool Library

 

All pages © The University of Liverpool, 2004 | Disclaimer | Accessibility | Staff | Students