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Compatible genetic and ecological estimates of dispersal rates in insect (Coenagrion mercuriale: Odonata: Zygoptera) populations: analysis of ‘neighbourhood size’ using a more precise estimator

Watts, Phillip C.; Rousset, Francois; Saccheri, Ilik J.; Leblois, Raphael; Kemp, Stephen J. and Thompson, David J. (2007) Compatible genetic and ecological estimates of dispersal rates in insect (Coenagrion mercuriale: Odonata: Zygoptera) populations: analysis of ‘neighbourhood size’ using a more precise estimator. Molecular Ecology, 16 (4). pp. 737-751. ISSN 1365-294X (Online); 0962-1083 (Print)

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Official URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com

Cited 46 times in WoS

Abstract

Genetic and demographic estimates of dispersal are often thought to be inconsistent. In this paper, we use the damselfly Coenagrion mercuriale (Odonata: Zygoptera) as a model to evaluate directly the relationship between estimates of dispersal rate measured during capture-mark-recapture fieldwork with those made from the spatial pattern of genetic markers in linear and two-dimensional habitats. We estimate the ‘neighbourhood size’ (Nb) - the product of the mean axial dispersal rate between parent and offspring and the population density - by a previously described technique, here called the regression method. Because C. mercuriale is less philopatric than species investigated previously by the regression method we evaluate a refined estimator that may be more applicable for relatively mobile species. Results from simulations and empirical data sets reveal that the new estimator performs better under most situations, except when dispersal is very localised relative to population density. Analysis of the C. mercuriale data extends previous results which demonstrated that demographic and genetic estimates of Nb by the regression method are equivalent to within a factor of two at local scales where genetic estimates are less affected by habitat heterogeneity, stochastic processes and/or differential selective regimes. The corollary is that with a little insight into a species’ ecology the pattern of spatial genetic structure provides quantitative information on dispersal rates and/or population densities that has real value for conservation management.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:Published article online: 05 Dec 2006 Issue online: 05 Feb 2007
Uncontrolled Keywords:capture–mark–recapture; conservation, dispersal; isolation by distance; spatial genetic structure; COENAGRION; COENAGRION MERCURIALE; ODONATA; POPULATIONS; LIFETIME MATING SUCCESS; DEMOGRAPHIC PARAMETERS; NATURAL-POPULATIONS; RECAPTURE DATA; DISTANCE; MICROSATELLITE; FLOW; DIFFERENTIATION; INDIVIDUALS; SCALE
Subjects:Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH426 Genetics
Departments, Research Centres and Related Units:Academic Faculties, Institutes and Research Centres > Faculty of Science > Department of Biological Sciences
DOI:10.1111/j.1365-294X.2006.03184.x
Publisher's Statement:© 2006 The Authors Journal compilation © 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The definitive version is available at www.blackwell-synergy.com
Refereed:Yes
Status:Published
ID Code:230
Deposited On:11 Aug 2008 14:57
Last Modified:20 May 2011 18:46

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